Table of Contents

This is one of a
series of paintings
by Robert Butler
that depict
turn-of-the-century scenes from twelve
of Florida's major
agricultural industries.
Ocean Farming
Florida consistently ranks among the top 10 states in the dockside value of fresh seafood, with average annual sales of more than $200 million, of which shrimp account for more than 30 percent. Florida fishermen catch more than 90 percent of the nations supply of grouper, pompano, mullet, stone crab, pink shrimp, spiny lobsters and Spanish mackerel.


All narratives accompanying the paintings were written by Robert Butler.
All rights reserved by the artist.

bullet.gif (943 bytes) Cracker Cowman
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Golden Grove
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Equine Splendor
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Farmers' Harvest
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Fern Garden
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Timber Shadows
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Shipping Cotton
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Ocean Farming
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Strawberry Patch
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Sugar Harvest
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Tomato Garden
bullet.gif (943 bytes) Beekeeping in the Pines
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Ocean Farming

One could easily surmise that shrimping has long been an occupation of man.

Old World seafarers found many shell mounds when they encountered New World sea-going cultures. It requires no stretch of the imagination to consider shrimp as part of the diet of ancient New World voyagers.

Today, through modern technology, this delicacy of the sea has found its way into the diet of people the world over. Many millions will never visit the seashore but can still enjoy a colorful variety of palatable expressions in the form of shrimp.

Though the back-breaking work and brutal hours of shrimpers is seldom appreciated at a dinner table, shrimpers know all too well the beguiling smile of a golden sunrise, the seductive beckoning of waters unexplored, and the unlimited bounty waiting for the brave and the free.

Men who go down to the sea take risks, but there can be no contest against salt in the blood, a good pair of sea legs, and a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Its the American way.

Robert Butler 1999