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Florida-Agriculture.com
Division of Marketing and Development
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Mayo Building, M-9
407 South Calhoun Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0800
(850) 617-7300

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Adam H. Putnam, Commissioner
December = Tomato + Tangerine

Tomato
Tomato
Tangerine
Tangerine
Tomato

Find out where tomatoes are grown in Florida
Download a small version of the Fresh-2-U poster for December
Download an image of tomatoes
Download coloring pages for tomatoes
USDA nutritional information for tomatoes

Until only 100 years ago, the tomato was thought of as nothing more than a garden curiosity. Today about 700,000 acres of tomatoes are produced, making the tomato the leading greenhouse vegetable grown in the U.S. Tomatoes are sold by types rather than by varieties at retail. They are known as field-grown mature green, plum type, cherry type, greenhouse, and hydroponic (grown in nutrient solution rather than in soil). In 2000, Florida ranked number two in the nation in the value of tomatoes produced.

The best temperatures for ripening Florida tomatoes is between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperatures below 55 degrees can cause chill injury. Ripe tomatoes should never be stored in a cooler below 55 degrees Fahrenheit, while the green and pink ones should be stored at room temperature.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are low in calories, with only 35 calories for a whole medium tomato. They are also low in fat and sodium. Tomatoes provide an excellent source of vitamins A and C, while also providing potassium and fiber.

Florida tomatoes are available from September through June.

Tangerine

Find out where tangerines are grown in Florida.
Download a small version of the Fresh-2-U poster for December
Download an image of tangerines
Download coloring pages for tangerines
USDA nutritional information for tangerines

Tangerines are types of mandarin oranges. Native to southeastern Asia, they have now been cultivated in orange-growing regions around the world, including Florida. In 2000, Florida ranked number one in the nation in the value of tangerines produced.

Tangerines

The tangerine is usually smaller than an orange, with a stronger, more pungent aroma. They often have sections that separate readily, and are easy to peel. A good quality mandarin will be heavy for its size and deep orange depending on the variety. A puffy appearance and feel is normal.

Florida tangerines are available from September through May.

Mandarins are best eaten raw. If you must cook mandarins, heat them gently. Do not boil them or they will lose their flavor. Refrigerated and kept well ventilated, their typical shelf life is 14 to 28 days. Handle tangerines especially carefully, as they are delicate and subject to damage.

Tangerines and tangelos are good sources of vitamins A and C and potassium.

Click on the months below to view other featured fruits and vegetables. July and August do not have featured fruits and vegetables.

Jan | Feb | Mar | Apr | May | Jun | Jul | Aug | Sept | Oct | Nov | Dec
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