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Florida-Agriculture.com
Division of Marketing and Development
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Mayo Building, M-9
407 South Calhoun Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0800
(850) 617-7300

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Adam H. Putnam, Commissioner
November = Snap beans + Cucumber.

Snap Bean
Image of snap beans.
Cucumber
Cucumbers
Snap Bean

Find out where snap beans are grown in Florida
Download a small version of the Fresh-2-U poster for November
Download an image of snap beans
Download coloring pages for snap beans
USDA nutritional information for snap beans

Before the discovery of America, the Old World was familiar with many types of beans, but not with the “common bean.” Snap beans are believed to have originated in Central America and were distributed widely over both Americas by the Indians. The beans quickly became popular when introduced into 16th century Europe. It has been only in the last 100 years that the truly stringless snap beans were developed as we know them today. In 2000, Florida ranked number one in the nation in the value of snap beans produced.

Florida is ranked first nationally in the production, acreage and total value of fresh market snap beans. The state produces 43 percent of the U.S. total in terms of production.

Available year-round in Florida, green beans are a good source of dietary fiber and also contain vitamin C and folic acid. They are also an important source of potassium and many micronutrients.

When choosing beans, look for plump, crisp beans that are reasonably well shaped. The beans should have even color and fresh blossom ends and snap readily when broken. Many people prefer smaller beans, which are usually more tender. To store beans, wash to add moisture, place in a plastic bag, and put in the refrigerator.

One cup of cooked, fresh snap beans has only 30 calories and no fat, sodium, or cholesterol. It is also a good source of dietary fiber.

Cucumber

Find out where cucumbers are grown in Florida
Download a small version of the Fresh-2-U poster for November
Download an image of cucumbers
Download coloring pages for cucumbers
USDA nutritional information for cucumbers

Cucumbers were used as foods in ancient Egypt and were also a popular food with the Greeks and Romans. Columbus brought cucumbers to the New World where Indians shared the seeds with others. A hundred years later colonists found the vegetable when they settled in Virginia. In 2000, Florida ranked number one in the nation in the value of cucumbers produced.

Florida cucumbers are available from October through June.

Image of a group of cucumbers

Cucumbers are waxed to improve appearance and freshness and to reduce shriveling due to water loss. When buying them for slicing, choose those that are firm, bright, fresh, well shaped, and a good green color. When refrigerated and kept moist, they typically last 10 to 14 days.

When using cucumbers, use older ones before using newer ones, and cut only the amount you’ll need for one day. Wash in cold water before preparing, but don’t soak them. The skin holds in moisture, so leave it on.

A refreshing touch in salads, cucumbers are very low in calories and are a good source of vitamin E and potassium.

Click on the months below to view other featured fruits and vegetables. July and August do not have featured fruits and vegetables.

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