Skip over navigation

Florida-Agriculture.com
Division of Marketing and Development
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Mayo Building, M-9
407 South Calhoun Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0800
(850) 617-7300

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Adam H. Putnam, Commissioner
September= Mango + Carambola

Mango
Image of two Mangos.
Carambola
Image of two Carambolas



Mango

Find out where mangos are grown in Florida
Download a small version of the Fresh-2-U poster for September
Download an image of mangos
Download coloring pages for mangos
USDA nutritional information for mangos

Native to India and southeast Asia, mangos were introduced to Florida in 1833. They are one of the most popular fruit crops in tropical and subtropical areas of the world.

Although the fruit will ripen on the tree, it is usually picked commercially for shipment to market when it is firm and green. The crop is considered mature when the shoulder of the fruit fills out and some fruits on the tree have begun to change color from green to yellow. Mature fruit is available in Florida from May through September.

Mangos are commonly eaten fresh or used in salads, desserts, sauces, juices, or chutney. They are good sources of vitamin A and C.

Mangos are best when allowed to ripen at room temperature until soft. Smooth skin surrounds the fleshy, pale-yellow to deep-orange edible portion that is richly aromatic and juicy and has a pleasant sweet flavor. If not eaten fresh, mangos may be refrigerated for up to three days or made into a pulp and frozen.

Image of two Mangos.

Mangos are best when allowed to ripen at room temperature until soft. Smooth skin surrounds the fleshy, pale-yellow to deep-orange edible portion that is richly aromatic and juicy and has a pleasant sweet flavor. If not eaten fresh, mangos may be refrigerated for up to three days or made into a pulp and frozen.

Carambola

Find out where carambola is grown in Florida
Download a small version of the Fresh-2-U poster for September
Download an image of carambola
Download coloring pages for carambola
USDA nutritional information for carambola

For many centuries carambola have been cultivated in southeast Asia and Malaysia. They also grow well in Caribbean countries, Hawaii, Central and South America and in south Florida, where they were introduced more than 100 years ago. Several varieties have since been developed especially for growing in the state.

Florida carambola are available from August through March.

Image of Carambola growing on a tree.

The fruit has smooth flesh that is yellow to golden-yellow and is crisp and sweet and without fiber, which makes the fruit popular to be eaten fresh or for use in salads, desserts, sauces, and wine. Carambola are sometimes called star fruit, because when cut in cross-section, the slices are shaped like stars.

Carambola are a good source of vitamin C, vitamin A, phosphorous, and potassium.

To experience the best taste, allow the fruit to ripen at room temperature for two to five days until a yellow color develops on the inside of the ribs. When ripe, carambola are juicy and fragrant with a flavor that can vary from very sweet to sharply tangy, with the sweetest taste usually coming from the fruit with the broadest set ribs. Carambola can be eaten fresh or kept refrigerated in plastic bags for up to seven days.

Click on the months below to view other featured fruits and vegetables. July and August do not have featured fruits and vegetables.

Jan | Feb | Mar | Apr | May | Jun | Jul | Aug | Sept | Oct | Nov | Dec
Get Adobe Acrobat Reader